DIY Aged Terra Cotta Pots

Do you add more houseplants & flowers to your home this time of year?

Terra cotta pots are a classic & inexpensive option for plants but the ordinary colour isn’t my style. Doing a quick paint job adds that aged look.

Here’s a look at the before and after – which only took a couple of minutes and hardly needed any supplies.

Supplies:

  • Terra Cotta Pot (from a home improvement store, dollar store)
  • Paint Brush (any size or shape)
  • White, Cream or Grey Paint ( I use my leftover house paint samples)
  • Newspaper or scrap paper to dab paint

 

The trick to this look is using a dry brush technique. Dip the paintbrush into a tiny bit of paint, then dab most of the paint off onto the scrap paper. Apply the paint to one spot on the pot and then rub it with the brush and gently spread the paint outwards until no more paint is left. Continue these steps until the whole pot is covered.

Using very little paint is key.

Here they are finished and below is a pot I did a few years ago with white paint. This larger herb pot was left outside over a couple of summers too so that’s what added to the patina.

Well spring may be a few months away still but it feels more lively in here with extra plants & forced bulbs around. 

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Weekend Project – Panel Moulding Feature Wall

Christmas may be over but I am in no rush to take down these holiday wreaths from the dining room.

This wall has become an area that I love to decorate for special occasions and it really was the addition of moulding that finished off this space.

A couple of years ago I partnered with Metrie to add wainscotting to the front entrance, stairway and upstairs hallway and had a bit of extra panel moulding leftover. That panel moulding from their French Curves Collection was the perfect solution that I had been searching for to go above the wall of the banquette in our dining area.

 

This is what the room looked like from the real estate listing photos when we purchased. Bit by bit I’m working to add layers and architectural interest to our builder basic home.

One afternoon I drew up some sketches to figure out proportions and by the end of the day, this was complete.

A small project like this can easily be completed with a few manual tools, including a hand saw and mitre box.

So if you’re looking for a little project this New Year, here is one that is very doable over a weekend if it’s a small space.

Here’s the original post:

Right now Jennifer Flores at Rambling Renovators is in the midst of powder room makeover that she plans to have done before hosting here NYE party and it’s looking so good. See the progress on her Instagram

 

 

 

How to make a Fresh Holiday Wreath

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Every year, my friend and neighbour Kate and I have a tradition of making wreaths together. We call it our own workshop where we have coffee while making some holiday decor.

This year we added juniper berries and dried eucalyptus (from the wreath I made last year) to our base of blue spruce from the tree in our front yard.

Here are some photos from the process.

This is the tree that gives so much to us!

Materials Ready

Creating little bundles with your greens in the secret to getting a cohesive look.

Layer the bundles of green over one another as you go around the wreath form, wrapping with paddle wire.

In a couple of months when the season is over, save the paddle wire to use again next year after you pull out the old greens.

Here it is at the front door — where it stayed for a couple of weeks until I had an idea that involved making a second one and bringing them both inside. More photos of that to come later but in the meantime, there is a sneak peek in my Instagram feed.

 

More Fresh Wreath Tutorials:

Boxwood Wreath DIY

 

Eucalyptus Wreath DIY

Dining Area Update

How to Install Panel Moulding for Beginners
After finishing the moulding installation throughout the staircase with Metrie I had a bit of extra panel moulding, just enough to do one more project. After seeing how much depth and interest trim brings to the walls I decided to do a quick project above the kitchen table. It gets so much easier with practice and something this scale could be done with a hand saw, mitre box and hammer, no special tools required.

Adding Architectural ElementsThis is the wall before.

Panel Moulding DIY

I put scrap pieces of moulding up and tried different placement, taking photos to get an idea of what would look best. Then, I did a sketch with the final measurements before cutting the moulding to size.Planning Panel Moulding Layout // Shibang Designs

Panel Molding DIYThese boxes are 54″ in height and since I was only doing three, I put the pieces up one at a time. With the height, I left enough room at the top so that if one day we wanted to add crown moulding that could still be an option. Panel MouldingNot every step is pictured here but there are more general instructions in my first tutorial.
Panel Moulding DIY

Panel Moulding DIY

This is what the area looked like in the real estate listing.
DIY Kitchen Makeover

Related Posts:

hand-tools
How to Install Panel Moulding
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs
Staircase Makeover Reveal
Featured on Apartment Therapy
Farmhouse Table Makeover Featured on Apartment Therapy

Staircase Reveal

Natural Garland Detail // Shibang Designs

If you’ve been following along on Instagram or previous blog posts, I’ve been sharing glimpses into my staircase makeover. The wall had been painted for two years, waiting for moulding and thanks to Metrie it has become a reality. There was no major renovation involved. I broke down the steps, starting with painting the walls & staircase spindles, refinishing the banister and finishing with  chair rail and panel moulding that starts at the front entry and continues to the upstairs hallway. The painting and refinishing had a lot of impact, but it wasn’t until I added the moulding that the staircase became a strong feature.

This was a big learning curve for me, but it’s not impossible, it just takes patience and attention to detail. It’s amazing to see how much dimension the moulding brings, and it makes this formerly overlooked space seem larger. Immediately after finishing I made a fresh garland to dress up the staircase since it’s now a main focal point and I was feeling the holiday spirit.

img_0576 This is the view from the main floor.
upstairs-croppedThat’s the kitchen off to the right.Chair Rail & Panel Moulding Complete // Shibang DesignsThe view from the kitchen.Upper Landing After // Shibang DesignsdownstairsMetrie Moulding Detail // Shibang DesignsAfter Installing Panel Moulding & Chair Rail // Shibang Designs The moulding continuing through the front hallway.
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs

This is a reminder of what it looked like when we first moved in and what I did to get here.

Below are the Moulding Profiles that I Used:

Metrie MDF Chair Rail

Metrie French Curves  Panel Moulding

With this project now completed I definitely have my eye on some other plain walls in the house that could benefit from some architectural elements. Are you thinking about adding some moulding to your home? If so, I have shared my process with lots of photos in the blog posts below.

Previous Posts:

Staircase Before // Shibang Designs
Adding Architectural Elements – BEFORE
Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs
DIY Trim Tutorial

Panel Moulding & Trim Tutorial

Diy Trim Moulding Tutorial. It is possible and this tutorial will show you how.
Have you ever imagined how your walls would look with panel moulding or a chair rail? Without any previous experience, I tackled this, and the result is even better than I imagined, and it’s easier than I thought it would be to make and install. As I mentioned in the previous post, I have partnered with Metrie to acheive this look. I was already choosing their products before and besides having a vast selection of affordable profiles, their MDF is made in Canada, Ontario specifically.

DIY Molding Tutorial

Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs

I’ve broken down the moulding applications into three categories: beginner, intermediate and advanced. I would recommend starting from beginner to get comfortable with the process. It takes some practice to wrap your head around angle calculations but once you start it begins to make sense. The chair rail that I used is this one and the panel moulding is this profile.

chair-rail-panel-moulding-diagram-text

The staircase was the hardest part to do. Not only are the angles up the stairs but there are a lot of irregular angles on the landings as well. Doing a staircase requires dusting off your geometry skills and it is not impossible, but if you area a beginner, I recommend starting with a typical room instead.

Staircase Diagram DIY // Shibang Designs

The process that I followed included some instructions I learned from books that I took out from the library, and some was my way of figuring it out. Planning is important to know how much material you’ll need and to consider how it will flow with potentially adding more moulding in the future. These are the books that I borrowed from the library that gave me some guidance: Decorating with Architectural Trimwork by Jay Silber and Trim Transformations. I found that these books were a useful reference and give lots more useful information as well.

Trim Transformations, Architectural Trimwork

Sketchbook Moulding Planning // Shibang Designs

To get started, choose your moulding and sketch it out in a little book. It helps with planning, if you have all notes contained in one place. To determine the placement and get a rough idea of how much material is needed, I found that using painter’s tape helped to get a quick visual. From there I was able to roughly figure out the size of the boxes and placement of the chair rail before sketching out and planning the exact sizes.

Calculating how much moulding is required for the paneled boxes requires a lot of planning. As a starting point, I used painter’s tape and placed it on the wall and adjusted as needed. You can also draw this out on paper, which I did afterward once I was ready to finalize the sizes. Even though I thought I had planned everything, little changes came up along the way so having extra material helped.

moulding-prep-shibang-designs

I am more comfortable using hand tools, but for the panel moulding, I borrowed my friend’s mitre saw to speed up the process. I also found that gluing the frames corners and then carefully installing the frame on the wall made it manageable to work alone. It is very helpful to write the length on the back because it gets confusing once you have multiple pieces cut.

moulding-frames-diy-shibang-designs

DIY Panel Moulding Frames // Shibang Designs

For frame assembly, I originally made jigs and attempted to use a nail gun, but it split the MDF that I was using. Instead, I ended up using construction adhesive to connect the corners, and after checking that the corners were square, I left them to dry and carefully moved them and hammered them to the wall as pictured below.

moulding-installation

To install the frames, I used a level and marked a consistent space between the chair rail and the top of the moulding frame. As I’ve mentioned before, I am more comfortable with hand tools and working with a hammer and nail setter allowed me to install the frames alone, which I couldn’t have done with a nail gun. That’s just my preference, but of course, nail guns work and are faster, just watch out for what’s behind the wall to make sure you don’t knick any wires.

The final step is caulking, which makes a huge difference for filling the cracks and giving the moulding a polished look. Of course, this doesn’t hide huge gaps but it does help get a nice finished look. I bought a caulking gun, just a basic one, and have found it to make a huge difference when applying caulking evenly. Cut the tip off with scissors to get a finer tip. On my model, if you use the spout cutter it cuts too big and makes the application sloppy.

DIY Panel Moulding and Chair Rail

I’m just about done, only part of the stairs remain and the whole process has become so much easier and it has completely transformed our home. Now the other walls seem so boring without any trim and after completing the staircase anything else will seem easy in comparison.

For more ideas of how interior finishing can be used, I’ve created an Architectural Elements Pinterest board which has some ideas from designers for inspiration. In addition on Metrie’s Pinterest page they show finished rooms using their Finishing Collections, which is helpful in selecting the right trim style and profile.

The previous post with before photos can be found below:

Entry Before