Powder Room – Before & After

This before and after of our powder room has been a gradual project. A couple of years ago I shared photos of how I installed wooden shelves behind the toilet to create a display area and storage for hand towels.

The first change I made to the powder room was to paint it a dark teal because a small space is perfect for experimenting and trying something bold. Next, I replaced the mirror with a vintage one that I had. Below is the listing photo of the bathroom.

This is the only photo I took of the bathroom before because I was pretty quick to get a new coat of paint on the wall.

In September I won a contest and my prize was my choice of faucet from Delta Canada. I chose this single handle Victorian faucet to go in on our pedestal sink. The old-fashioned style of this reminds me of the taps in the bathrooms in the house that my Grandpa’s family built in the early 1900’s when they first came to Canada. I chose the single lever style to make it easier for kids to use and the chrome finish to match what was already in the room.

I chose the single lever style to make it easier for kids to use and the chrome finish to match what was already in the room.

This is what we had before so the new faucet was a big upgrade and like adding shiny jewellery to the room.

For most of my projects I like to use what I already have, so even though I was changing the faucet I wanted to keep the same pedestal sink.

My neighbour kindly installed this new faucet for us one Saturday morning. He bought shut off valves from Home Depot and new hoses to connect it.

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the faucet I added a wide, modern chair rail by Metrie to add interest on the wall behind the faucet. Now that I’ve done it enough times, trim installation is a quick project, especially in a tiny space like this. I did have to use a mitre saw to cut this chair rail because of the 4″ width and 1″ thick profile.

I painted the pieces before installing them. Since I didn’t have a lot of leftover paint from the bathroom I did a basecoat with a different dark paint I had first.

To install I used the same process as my other posts with a hammer and nail setter.

Here’s the room now and another before & after collage with the faucet and trim.

Dining Area Update

How to Install Panel Moulding for Beginners
After finishing the moulding installation throughout the staircase with Metrie I had a bit of extra panel moulding, just enough to do one more project. After seeing how much depth and interest trim brings to the walls I decided to do a quick project above the kitchen table. It gets so much easier with practice and something this scale could be done with a hand saw, mitre box and hammer, no special tools required.

Adding Architectural ElementsThis is the wall before.

Panel Moulding DIY

I put scrap pieces of moulding up and tried different placement, taking photos to get an idea of what would look best. Then, I did a sketch with the final measurements before cutting the moulding to size.Planning Panel Moulding Layout // Shibang Designs

Panel Molding DIYThese boxes are 54″ in height and since I was only doing three, I put the pieces up one at a time. With the height, I left enough room at the top so that if one day we wanted to add crown moulding that could still be an option. Panel MouldingNot every step is pictured here but there are more general instructions in my first tutorial.
Panel Moulding DIY

Panel Moulding DIY

This is what the area looked like in the real estate listing.
DIY Kitchen Makeover

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Staircase Reveal

Natural Garland Detail // Shibang Designs

If you’ve been following along on Instagram or previous blog posts, I’ve been sharing glimpses into my staircase makeover. The wall had been painted for two years, waiting for moulding and thanks to Metrie it has become a reality. There was no major renovation involved. I broke down the steps, starting with painting the walls & staircase spindles, refinishing the banister and finishing with  chair rail and panel moulding that starts at the front entry and continues to the upstairs hallway. The painting and refinishing had a lot of impact, but it wasn’t until I added the moulding that the staircase became a strong feature.

This was a big learning curve for me, but it’s not impossible, it just takes patience and attention to detail. It’s amazing to see how much dimension the moulding brings, and it makes this formerly overlooked space seem larger. Immediately after finishing I made a fresh garland to dress up the staircase since it’s now a main focal point and I was feeling the holiday spirit.

img_0576 This is the view from the main floor.
upstairs-croppedThat’s the kitchen off to the right.Chair Rail & Panel Moulding Complete // Shibang DesignsThe view from the kitchen.Upper Landing After // Shibang DesignsdownstairsMetrie Moulding Detail // Shibang DesignsAfter Installing Panel Moulding & Chair Rail // Shibang Designs The moulding continuing through the front hallway.
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs

This is a reminder of what it looked like when we first moved in and what I did to get here.

Below are the Moulding Profiles that I Used:

Metrie MDF Chair Rail

Metrie French Curves  Panel Moulding

With this project now completed I definitely have my eye on some other plain walls in the house that could benefit from some architectural elements. Are you thinking about adding some moulding to your home? If so, I have shared my process with lots of photos in the blog posts below.

Previous Posts:

Staircase Before // Shibang Designs
Adding Architectural Elements – BEFORE
Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs
DIY Trim Tutorial

Panel Moulding & Trim Tutorial

Diy Trim Moulding Tutorial. It is possible and this tutorial will show you how.
Have you ever imagined how your walls would look with panel moulding or a chair rail? Without any previous experience, I tackled this, and the result is even better than I imagined, and it’s easier than I thought it would be to make and install. As I mentioned in the previous post, I have partnered with Metrie to acheive this look. I was already choosing their products before and besides having a vast selection of affordable profiles, their MDF is made in Canada, Ontario specifically.

DIY Molding Tutorial

Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs

I’ve broken down the moulding applications into three categories: beginner, intermediate and advanced. I would recommend starting from beginner to get comfortable with the process. It takes some practice to wrap your head around angle calculations but once you start it begins to make sense. The chair rail that I used is this one and the panel moulding is this profile.

chair-rail-panel-moulding-diagram-text

The staircase was the hardest part to do. Not only are the angles up the stairs but there are a lot of irregular angles on the landings as well. Doing a staircase requires dusting off your geometry skills and it is not impossible, but if you area a beginner, I recommend starting with a typical room instead.

Staircase Diagram DIY // Shibang Designs

The process that I followed included some instructions I learned from books that I took out from the library, and some was my way of figuring it out. Planning is important to know how much material you’ll need and to consider how it will flow with potentially adding more moulding in the future. These are the books that I borrowed from the library that gave me some guidance: Decorating with Architectural Trimwork by Jay Silber and Trim Transformations. I found that these books were a useful reference and give lots more useful information as well.

Trim Transformations, Architectural Trimwork

Sketchbook Moulding Planning // Shibang Designs

To get started, choose your moulding and sketch it out in a little book. It helps with planning, if you have all notes contained in one place. To determine the placement and get a rough idea of how much material is needed, I found that using painter’s tape helped to get a quick visual. From there I was able to roughly figure out the size of the boxes and placement of the chair rail before sketching out and planning the exact sizes.

Calculating how much moulding is required for the paneled boxes requires a lot of planning. As a starting point, I used painter’s tape and placed it on the wall and adjusted as needed. You can also draw this out on paper, which I did afterward once I was ready to finalize the sizes. Even though I thought I had planned everything, little changes came up along the way so having extra material helped.

moulding-prep-shibang-designs

I am more comfortable using hand tools, but for the panel moulding, I borrowed my friend’s mitre saw to speed up the process. I also found that gluing the frames corners and then carefully installing the frame on the wall made it manageable to work alone. It is very helpful to write the length on the back because it gets confusing once you have multiple pieces cut.

moulding-frames-diy-shibang-designs

DIY Panel Moulding Frames // Shibang Designs

For frame assembly, I originally made jigs and attempted to use a nail gun, but it split the MDF that I was using. Instead, I ended up using construction adhesive to connect the corners, and after checking that the corners were square, I left them to dry and carefully moved them and hammered them to the wall as pictured below.

moulding-installation

To install the frames, I used a level and marked a consistent space between the chair rail and the top of the moulding frame. As I’ve mentioned before, I am more comfortable with hand tools and working with a hammer and nail setter allowed me to install the frames alone, which I couldn’t have done with a nail gun. That’s just my preference, but of course, nail guns work and are faster, just watch out for what’s behind the wall to make sure you don’t knick any wires.

The final step is caulking, which makes a huge difference for filling the cracks and giving the moulding a polished look. Of course, this doesn’t hide huge gaps but it does help get a nice finished look. I bought a caulking gun, just a basic one, and have found it to make a huge difference when applying caulking evenly. Cut the tip off with scissors to get a finer tip. On my model, if you use the spout cutter it cuts too big and makes the application sloppy.

DIY Panel Moulding and Chair Rail

I’m just about done, only part of the stairs remain and the whole process has become so much easier and it has completely transformed our home. Now the other walls seem so boring without any trim and after completing the staircase anything else will seem easy in comparison.

For more ideas of how interior finishing can be used, I’ve created an Architectural Elements Pinterest board which has some ideas from designers for inspiration. In addition on Metrie’s Pinterest page they show finished rooms using their Finishing Collections, which is helpful in selecting the right trim style and profile.

The previous post with before photos can be found below:

Entry Before

Adding Architectural Elements – Before

Since moving into our home two years ago I have been on a mission to update, improve and add character to this builder basic home. The main entry and staircase are a focal point that I wanted to emphasize with moulding. I am so excited to be partnering with Metrie to use their beautiful mouldings to add the style and substance to our home.

Entry Before Adding Chair Rail & Panel Moulding

Before // Shibang Designs
The Main Entrance & Staircase Before
Rough Planning Sketch of Moulding
A Rough Sketch of the Moulding

I chose this chair rail for its thick profile and rounded shape that would work with the rest of the home. I had been searching for the moulding to use below the chair rail for quite some time then I came across panel mouding from Metrie’s French Curves Collection. It has lines that coordinated well with the chair rail I had selected.

Metrie Moulding Profiles - Chair Rail & Panel Molding

Refinished Banister -- Goodbye Golden Oak!

I started out by painting the walls and doors as well as refinishing the banister railing to get the other main elements in the room ready. Since I knew that I wanted a chair rail, I went ahead and painted the wall white, using painter’s tape to make a clean line on the lower portion of the wall. Going up the staircase I used the shadow that was cast by the railing to get an idea of the angle and adjusted it from there. Painting gave me an instant visual for how the walls would look with the moulding.

The installation of the chair rail has been a huge learning curve. When I started out, I had no idea about the angles so I bought a very basic mitre box, hand saw and nail setter. Thinking about how wood panelling would have been installed by carpenters before power tools gave me the confidence to ease into the project with limited hand tools.

These are the tools that I used to install the chair rail. If I had known how much I would use my mitre box and saw, I would have bought a slightly better quality one. This one works fine but there are others available for not too much more.

How to DIY Chair Rail Using a Mitre Box & Hand Saw -- No Power Tools Necessary!

Here’s a look at how the front entry is looking so far. The moulding makes the space seem larger in this tight space.

Entryway After Painting and Installing Chair Rail DIY

How to Install Chair Rail Moulding

Working through the main entrance was pretty easy once I got the hang of understanding how to cut the angles. What I didn’t consider was how angles would get a bit trickier on walls that aren’t square and staircases that have complicated angles.

DIY Chair Rail in Hallway Using a Hand Saw & Mitre Box

Here’s a look at the upstairs hallway where I’m continuing the moulding for a cohesive look.

Planning Placement for Picture Frame Wainscotting

I’ve begun cutting the panel moulding and I’m in the process of creating jigs to assemble the frames before attaching them to the wall. For this part and the complex angles on the stairs, I am using books for guidance and technical advice.

DIY Panel Moulding -- Making a Jig

Once I start to get the frames cut and up on the wall, I’ll make a tutorial showing more of the steps. What I’ve learned so far is that installing interior mouldings is much easier than I thought it would be when you’re sticking to rooms with square corners. Installing a chair rail in a powder room or hallway could easily be done with a hand saw if you don’t have a mitre saw.

Related Projects:

 

Black Interior Doors
Black Interior Doors

Shiplap Planked Wall

DIY Shiplap by Shibang Designs, original tutorial by House of Smiths

Here’s a look at the shiplap wall that my friend Kate and I installed in my living room. Since we won’t be knocking down this wall that separates the kitchen I decided to make it an accent instead. Originally I had wanted to do a brick veneer but the cost was 10 times more than going the wood plank route.DIY Shiplap //Shibang Designs This was the wall before. The wood planks were  cut at the hardware store from a larger sheet of plywood.DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs Around the top edge I wanted crown moulding and since I do not have the tools to cut it I used these pre-fabricated corners. It was tricky for us to install this part.
DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs DIY Shiplap // Shibang DesignsWhat I didn’t expect was how the ceilings would appear so much taller with the moulding.
DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs Since I like neat and tidy edges I added corner guards where the panelling edges meet because this wall is exposed from all four sides. Shibang Designs

The tutorial that I followed for this wall was from The House of Smiths. These are my process photos but for lots of information I suggest going to the original post from The House of Smiths.House of Smiths DIY Planked Wall TutorialThis was an inexpensive project that adds lots of character to the space. It is relatively easy if you have a blank wall without many outlets or vents and requires very few tools to complete.

Black Interior Doors

Paint it Black!

Have you ever thought about painting your interior doors black? I saw a story on Houzz this summer about painting interior doors black, and they had great reasons to do it. While picking up the black paint roller seemed risky at first I never second guessed that decision.

Before & After Black Interior Doors

We have a narrow hallway with four doors in a very tight space. After painting the inside of the front door, I hesitated about doing the closet door too and waited a few days to paint it. Then I also changed the basic door leading to the garage into a chalkboard door. The hardware was all shiny brass, and I spray painted them following the instructions from The Creative Cubby using oil rubbed bronze spray paint.

Black Door Painting

High Impact with Black, White & Grey Paint

Here’s a look at the basement door that I just painted black a couple of weeks ago after re-reading the story on Houzz about how a black door can make the ceiling look taller by drawing the eye up with the contrasting colour.

Before & After Black Basement Door

Black Basement Door

IMG_4458I recommend reading 11 Reasons to Paint Your Interior Doors Black on Houzz if you haven’t already.

 

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Adding Architectural Elements - Before
Adding Architectural Elements