A Quick & Cheerful Indoor Planter

This was a very quick project made using what I already had around the house. You could easily adapt this idea to work with jars and scrap wood. Since we have lots of these pickle jars, I based mine on using 4 of them.
A few cuts with a handsaw along a pencil line and then was nailed together.
This is the finished box in the raw pine. It was okay like this but I wanted to try out a stain. I was given Minwax staining cloths and was waiting for a project to use them for. This quick wooden planter box was perfect for these cloths because I didn’t need to make a mess getting supplies out. Just one cloth was enough for this and it’s as simple as rubbing the cloth on the wood and then waiting an hour for it to dry. This colour is Natural Oak, a colour new to me but one that I’d use again.

Above was the box before the stain and below is how it was after. This planter is long and low enough to sit on the table without blocking the view and it’s easy to change up what goes inside. This could work for a wedding as well.

The only thing about creating something in a larger size is that you’ll need lots of flowers to fill it. I think I cut half of the daffodils in the yard to fill this. Potted plants could sit inside instead of jars too.

One Room Challenge – Weeks 2 & 3

Last post for the One Room Challenge, I shared photos of what our yard looks like and how I plan to build a planter box and trellis to create some privacy. Since this project is all about building one structure, I’ve been working on the design and finalizing measurements before getting the wood. I printed off a photo of the backyard area that I’ll be making the planter for and drew my measurements on tracing paper. Seeing the trellis grid drawn out helped me visualize the final details and figure out measurements.

A lot of the plans I have for our current yard are based on our previous home in Montreal that reminded us of a secret garden. The previous owners had built a pergola and trellises that filled in with grape vines during the summer.

I liked the large squares which I plan to base my trellis on. The dark grey, semi-transparent stain held up over the winters.
We’re still a long way from getting this much privacy in our current yard but the trellis will be a start.
The weather here is still cool and rainy so hopefully next week I can start building.

 

The progress of the other 200 plus participants can be seen here.

Powder Room – Before & After

This before and after of our powder room has been a gradual project. A couple of years ago I shared photos of how I installed wooden shelves behind the toilet to create a display area and storage for hand towels.

The first change I made to the powder room was to paint it a dark teal because a small space is perfect for experimenting and trying something bold. Next, I replaced the mirror with a vintage one that I had. Below is the listing photo of the bathroom.

This is the only photo I took of the bathroom before because I was pretty quick to get a new coat of paint on the wall.

In September I won a contest and my prize was my choice of faucet from Delta Canada. I chose this single handle Victorian faucet to go in on our pedestal sink. The old-fashioned style of this reminds me of the taps in the bathrooms in the house that my Grandpa’s family built in the early 1900’s when they first came to Canada. I chose the single lever style to make it easier for kids to use and the chrome finish to match what was already in the room.

I chose the single lever style to make it easier for kids to use and the chrome finish to match what was already in the room.

This is what we had before so the new faucet was a big upgrade and like adding shiny jewellery to the room.

For most of my projects I like to use what I already have, so even though I was changing the faucet I wanted to keep the same pedestal sink.

My neighbour kindly installed this new faucet for us one Saturday morning. He bought shut off valves from Home Depot and new hoses to connect it.

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the faucet I added a wide, modern chair rail by Metrie to add interest on the wall behind the faucet. Now that I’ve done it enough times, trim installation is a quick project, especially in a tiny space like this. I did have to use a mitre saw to cut this chair rail because of the 4″ width and 1″ thick profile.

I painted the pieces before installing them. Since I didn’t have a lot of leftover paint from the bathroom I did a basecoat with a different dark paint I had first.

To install I used the same process as my other posts with a hammer and nail setter.

Here’s the room now and another before & after collage with the faucet and trim.

Refinished Staircase Banister Before & After

 

banister-before-after-shibang-designs

Sometimes a lot of elbow grease and very little in the way of supplies can have a huge impact. In this case, I’m talking about refinishing staircase banisters. This was something that I tackled early on because the honey oak colour was not my style.

My neighbour refinished her banister and this gave me the confidence to try it myself. This was a lot of work (especially since we have two staircases) and it’s messy but it was worth the effort!

I used leftover paint as a primer on the spindles followed by a topcoat of the leftover kitchen cabinet paint.

I chose a very dark, almost black stain for the railing. There’s a Canadian company, Saman, that I like to use because the stain is water based and it had the topcoat mixed into the product.

Kitchen Staircase

This photo is from when we first moved in and before any of my painting & moulding projects.

stairs_kitchen- before

Here it is after using a stripper to remove the varnish followed by sanding. This is an important step because without the necessary preparation and removal of the varnish, the stain won’t go on the wood evenly.

Staircase Banister Progress

This is the finished banister.Finished Banister // Shibang Designs

Basement Staircase

This is how the staircase that leads to the basement looked when we first moved in.  Here I started by painting the walls a lighter colour and then we added a large, statement light fixture.

Staircase Before // Shibang Designs

This is the view from the basement.

Basement Staircase

The view from upstairs.Basement Banister Progress

The finished banister.

basement_after

How to Refinish a Staircase Banister // Shibang Designs

If you look through previous posts there are lots of other photos that show the finished banister from other angles.

How to Install Board & Batten

How to Install a Board & Batten Wall by Shibang Designs

Today I’ve got a tutorial and reveal of the completed board & batten wall, created in collaboration with The Home Depot Canada. Since I’m usually learning as I go, The Home Depot staff are who I rely on to answer questions and give advice for whatever project I’m working on.

These are the steps that I followed. It’s important to measure, plan, keep lines level and plumb, nail into studs when possible and when in doubt – ask for advice!

ing Wood Cut to Size at The Home Depot Canada

Board & Batten Wall Tutorial // Shibang Designs

Removing the baseboard was my first step because it was thin and wouldn’t look right with the pine boards. I used a flathead screwdriver to pry it off and it came off much easier than I expected.

Next, I marked all of the studs and finalized the placement of my vertical boards. These boards I had cut to length at The Home Depot Canada. Since I live close to the store I planned to start with only these 1″ x 4″ Pine Select boards and then return to have the horizontal pieces cut. When choosing boards make sure to get ones that are straight. If you don’t know how to check, just ask for assistance. If the boards are warped it makes it more challenging to attach them to the wall.

Board & Batten Wall Tutorial // Shibang Designs

I used 1 1/2″ spiral finishing nails which were recommended to me since they have more grip than a regular finishing nail. For some boards that don’t stay on the wall flush, I used a few dots of Construction Adhesive to make sure they held.
img_3568

The next step was to take the measurements between the boards before heading back to get the horizontal pieces cut.  The policy is us that you pay after the first two cuts but if you visit when it’s not too busy the staff usually go above and beyond. Having a sketch helps to remember which pieces go where and what lengths are required.

home-depot-cut-list

When I got home I started figuring out spacing on the wall. I did have to adjust a couple of boards with my hand saw because I had taken the wrong measurement.

I started with the top pieces and made sure they were in a level line. It turns out that our basement height is quite uneven so to create a level line across the top I left a gap (which will later be covered with moulding). These smaller pieces are held up with 2 -3 nails. Along the bottom edge, I wanted to make sure that in the future if we were going to replace the flooring it would be possible to easily remove the bottom boards.

Painting the bottom pieces before adding them to the wall would have made it much easier. To save yourself some hassle, paint them first!

Board & Batten DIY

Where the boards intersected I used a wood filler and sanded once it was dry.Board & Batten Wall DIY with Pine Boards

When it comes time to paint, if you’re using a product that has a primer built in you can paint directly onto the wood. Along all of the edges where the boards meet the wall, I ran a strip of caulking along it. I have a caulking gun and have found it to very worthwhile to have. It allows you to purchase tubes of caulking or construction adhesive which are easier to apply than little containers that you squeeze out.
Board & Batten Wall DIY // Shibang DesignsBoard & Batten Wall DIYAfter final sanding, painting and caulking.How to Install Board & Batten

Adding an Accent WallThis reveal wasn’t about changing everything in the room. The paint colour stayed the same but now the basement has a feature and interest that it didn’t have before.
Board & Batten Wall DIYThank you to The Home Depot Canada for helping make this vision a reality! If you have an idea of a project but don’t know where to start they are a wonderful resource of information and guidance.

Here’s a little reminder of where it started and some of the steps along the way.

How to take walls from bland to interesting with the addition of board and batten. Full tutorial on the blog. Shibang Designs

Related Posts:

Basement Before
Basement Before

Basement Accent Wall – Plans

before

Time for another project! This time I’m going to be adding an accent wall to our basement thanks to The Home Depot Canada.

Throughout all of my home improvement projects, The Home Depot staff have been there to give me guidance and answer any questions. There are so many possibilities to create furniture and home accents without having a workshop at home. I like being able to show up with a plan and leave with the wood cut so that I can begin building, sometimes right in the living room when it’s too cold to work outside.

Planning Sketches for Board & Batten LayoutThe plan for the basement is to create a board and batten style accent wall using Pine Select 1″ x 4″ Boards. I am choosing wood since it’s for the basement and I plan to paint it the same white as the walls currently are. Above are a couple of sketches I did to figure out the spacing and corresponding measurements.

Basement BeforeHere is how the basement looked when we first moved in. Below is how it currently is after I painted it white for a lighter look and refinished the banister. Basement Before // Shibang DesignsPaint has quick and inexpensive results, but the addition of paneling takes it to another level and can expand the sense of space, which can be very useful in a basement. Natural light enters from the stairwell which should add some extra dimension to this wall once the wood is installed.Basement Studio // Shibang Designs

Once the wood gets up on the wall there will be photos of the process plus more behind the scenes on my Instagram.

 

Related Posts:

Sofa Table DIYSofa table build with 2″ x 4″‘s

Floating Shelves DIY // Shibang Designs

Powder Room floating shelves

Dining Area Update

How to Install Panel Moulding for Beginners
After finishing the moulding installation throughout the staircase with Metrie I had a bit of extra panel moulding, just enough to do one more project. After seeing how much depth and interest trim brings to the walls I decided to do a quick project above the kitchen table. It gets so much easier with practice and something this scale could be done with a hand saw, mitre box and hammer, no special tools required.

Adding Architectural ElementsThis is the wall before.

Panel Moulding DIY

I put scrap pieces of moulding up and tried different placement, taking photos to get an idea of what would look best. Then, I did a sketch with the final measurements before cutting the moulding to size.Planning Panel Moulding Layout // Shibang Designs

Panel Molding DIYThese boxes are 54″ in height and since I was only doing three, I put the pieces up one at a time. With the height, I left enough room at the top so that if one day we wanted to add crown moulding that could still be an option. Panel MouldingNot every step is pictured here but there are more general instructions in my first tutorial.
Panel Moulding DIY

Panel Moulding DIY

This is what the area looked like in the real estate listing.
DIY Kitchen Makeover

Related Posts:

hand-tools
How to Install Panel Moulding
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs
Staircase Makeover Reveal
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Farmhouse Table Makeover Featured on Apartment Therapy

Staircase Reveal

Natural Garland Detail // Shibang Designs

If you’ve been following along on Instagram or previous blog posts, I’ve been sharing glimpses into my staircase makeover. The wall had been painted for two years, waiting for moulding and thanks to Metrie it has become a reality. There was no major renovation involved. I broke down the steps, starting with painting the walls & staircase spindles, refinishing the banister and finishing with  chair rail and panel moulding that starts at the front entry and continues to the upstairs hallway. The painting and refinishing had a lot of impact, but it wasn’t until I added the moulding that the staircase became a strong feature.

This was a big learning curve for me, but it’s not impossible, it just takes patience and attention to detail. It’s amazing to see how much dimension the moulding brings, and it makes this formerly overlooked space seem larger. Immediately after finishing I made a fresh garland to dress up the staircase since it’s now a main focal point and I was feeling the holiday spirit.

img_0576 This is the view from the main floor.
upstairs-croppedThat’s the kitchen off to the right.Chair Rail & Panel Moulding Complete // Shibang DesignsThe view from the kitchen.Upper Landing After // Shibang DesignsdownstairsMetrie Moulding Detail // Shibang DesignsAfter Installing Panel Moulding & Chair Rail // Shibang Designs The moulding continuing through the front hallway.
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs

This is a reminder of what it looked like when we first moved in and what I did to get here.

Below are the Moulding Profiles that I Used:

Metrie MDF Chair Rail

Metrie French Curves  Panel Moulding

With this project now completed I definitely have my eye on some other plain walls in the house that could benefit from some architectural elements. Are you thinking about adding some moulding to your home? If so, I have shared my process with lots of photos in the blog posts below.

Previous Posts:

Staircase Before // Shibang Designs
Adding Architectural Elements – BEFORE
Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs
DIY Trim Tutorial

Improved Boxwood Wreath

Simple Christmas Decor// Handmade Boxwood Wreath, Birch Poles & Cedar Swag

An Easy to Make Boxwood Wreath

Are you planning to make your own fresh wreaths this holiday season? It’s not too complicated and right now all of the boughs are readily available at grocery stores or maybe in your own yard.  Last year I shared how I made a boxwood wreath and this year I’m sharing an improved version.
Boxwood Wreath DIY // Shibang Designs

Supplies:

Once you have the basics then all you need to add (or clip from your yard) is the fresh greenery.

  • Wreath Form ( Wire or Grapevine)
  • Paddle Wire
  • Pruning Shears or Sharp Scissors
  • Fresh Greenery (2 Bunches for a Fuller Wreath)

 

Boxwood Wreath

To achieve a full and even wreath the key is to make small bundles of greenery that are roughly the same size. Rather than trying to use one large branch, cut it into smaller pieces, hold that bundle and secure it to the frame. Continue layering the bundles and securing them with the paddle wire.

Also using more greenery helps too. I used two large bunches of boxwood for this wreath compared to last year when I only used one. Last year I wrapped wire around each bundle that I added to the frame but this year I skipped that step and only did one continuous length of wire for the whole wreath.

These are the basics but berries and a mixture of greens could be added too.

 

How to Make a Boxwood Wreath// Shibang Designs
Boxwood Wreath 2015

A few photos of it finished wreath.

Boxwood Wreath, Brass Bell, Black Door

Panel Moulding & Trim Tutorial

Diy Trim Moulding Tutorial. It is possible and this tutorial will show you how.
Have you ever imagined how your walls would look with panel moulding or a chair rail? Without any previous experience, I tackled this, and the result is even better than I imagined, and it’s easier than I thought it would be to make and install. As I mentioned in the previous post, I have partnered with Metrie to acheive this look. I was already choosing their products before and besides having a vast selection of affordable profiles, their MDF is made in Canada, Ontario specifically.

DIY Molding Tutorial

Moulding DIY // Shibang Designs

I’ve broken down the moulding applications into three categories: beginner, intermediate and advanced. I would recommend starting from beginner to get comfortable with the process. It takes some practice to wrap your head around angle calculations but once you start it begins to make sense. The chair rail that I used is this one and the panel moulding is this profile.

chair-rail-panel-moulding-diagram-text

The staircase was the hardest part to do. Not only are the angles up the stairs but there are a lot of irregular angles on the landings as well. Doing a staircase requires dusting off your geometry skills and it is not impossible, but if you area a beginner, I recommend starting with a typical room instead.

Staircase Diagram DIY // Shibang Designs

The process that I followed included some instructions I learned from books that I took out from the library, and some was my way of figuring it out. Planning is important to know how much material you’ll need and to consider how it will flow with potentially adding more moulding in the future. These are the books that I borrowed from the library that gave me some guidance: Decorating with Architectural Trimwork by Jay Silber and Trim Transformations. I found that these books were a useful reference and give lots more useful information as well.

Trim Transformations, Architectural Trimwork

Sketchbook Moulding Planning // Shibang Designs

To get started, choose your moulding and sketch it out in a little book. It helps with planning, if you have all notes contained in one place. To determine the placement and get a rough idea of how much material is needed, I found that using painter’s tape helped to get a quick visual. From there I was able to roughly figure out the size of the boxes and placement of the chair rail before sketching out and planning the exact sizes.

Calculating how much moulding is required for the paneled boxes requires a lot of planning. As a starting point, I used painter’s tape and placed it on the wall and adjusted as needed. You can also draw this out on paper, which I did afterward once I was ready to finalize the sizes. Even though I thought I had planned everything, little changes came up along the way so having extra material helped.

moulding-prep-shibang-designs

I am more comfortable using hand tools, but for the panel moulding, I borrowed my friend’s mitre saw to speed up the process. I also found that gluing the frames corners and then carefully installing the frame on the wall made it manageable to work alone. It is very helpful to write the length on the back because it gets confusing once you have multiple pieces cut.

moulding-frames-diy-shibang-designs

DIY Panel Moulding Frames // Shibang Designs

For frame assembly, I originally made jigs and attempted to use a nail gun, but it split the MDF that I was using. Instead, I ended up using construction adhesive to connect the corners, and after checking that the corners were square, I left them to dry and carefully moved them and hammered them to the wall as pictured below.

moulding-installation

To install the frames, I used a level and marked a consistent space between the chair rail and the top of the moulding frame. As I’ve mentioned before, I am more comfortable with hand tools and working with a hammer and nail setter allowed me to install the frames alone, which I couldn’t have done with a nail gun. That’s just my preference, but of course, nail guns work and are faster, just watch out for what’s behind the wall to make sure you don’t knick any wires.

The final step is caulking, which makes a huge difference for filling the cracks and giving the moulding a polished look. Of course, this doesn’t hide huge gaps but it does help get a nice finished look. I bought a caulking gun, just a basic one, and have found it to make a huge difference when applying caulking evenly. Cut the tip off with scissors to get a finer tip. On my model, if you use the spout cutter it cuts too big and makes the application sloppy.

DIY Panel Moulding and Chair Rail

I’m just about done, only part of the stairs remain and the whole process has become so much easier and it has completely transformed our home. Now the other walls seem so boring without any trim and after completing the staircase anything else will seem easy in comparison.

For more ideas of how interior finishing can be used, I’ve created an Architectural Elements Pinterest board which has some ideas from designers for inspiration. In addition on Metrie’s Pinterest page they show finished rooms using their Finishing Collections, which is helpful in selecting the right trim style and profile.

The previous post with before photos can be found below:

Entry Before