Fresh Eucalyptus Wreath Part 2

This post from December 2017 about making a Fresh Eucalyptus Wreath has been getting lots of traffic lately so I am adding a new version to the post.

Now that I’ve made 3 versions with different varieties I will share what I’ve learned in case you are thinking of giving it a try this year.

I made that first wreath using seeded Eucalyptus on a 10″ wire frame. It dried out nicely and lasted about 3 months until the green started to turn a bit brown.

I saved the wreath and the following year I took it apart and used the dried leaves as an accent in my holiday wreath mixed with evergreens (as pictured below).

 

This summer I came across a large bunch of Eucalyptus in the grocery store for $15 and couldn’t pass up the chance to try to make a wreath out of it. Since I made this on a whim late at night I didn’t take any pictures of the process.

It was a bit tricky to work with and my hands were all sticky but the house smelled so good. I also added some lavender from our garden. I used the same process as for the other wreathes linked above.

This picture was taken in July when I had first made the wreath.

These photos were taken in November. The wreath has dried out very nicely, doesn’t drop leaves and has kept it’s colour.  

 

And since I love making wreaths, here’s another one I made last year. This was with seeded Eucalyptus and lavender and it stood up well to a cold Toronto winter out on the front door. Again I didn’t take pictures of the process because I was making it late at night but it was the same process as in my original Fresh Eucalyptus Wreath Tutorial.

 

Holiday Greenery: How to Make a Boxwood Wreath

How to Make a Boxwood WreathHave you ever been to Chicago during the holiday season? The first time that I ever noticed urns full of evergreen boughs and pretty branches was when I went to Chicago. For three years I went to that gorgeous city around this time for the One of a Kind Show and a highlight was always seeing the elegant displays on every corner.

Ever since then I’ve been working to improve my skills to make my wreaths, garlands and urns. I’m still figuring it out, but I have learned some techniques along the way for beginners.

By purchasing the boughs from the grocery store (or collecting them in the forest after a windstorm) and having a couple of basic supplies to reuse every year makes it less expensive to do it yourself.

These are very basic instructions for how I made my wreath.

Materials Needed:

  • Wire Wreath Form
  • Florist Wire
  • Garden Shears or Scissors
  • Greenery – Cedar & Pine is $5 a bunch at the grocery store and boxwood or oregonia is $10. I used one bunch, but for a fuller wreath you’d need two.

Time to complete 15 – 20 minutes.

Oregonia/Boxwood Wreath Detail

Cut off pieces of the boxwood to shorter lengths and bundle about three together with wire, leaving some extra length of wire. How to make a boxwood wreathAttach the bunch to the wire frame using the extra wire at the end.How to make a boxwood wreath After you layer all of the bunches together around the frame loop, the spool of wire around to secure everything. IMG_8157The key is using a wreath form to work with to get the nice round shape. I have tried in the past without a form, and they were not as successful, and they were more frustrating to make.

How to Make a Boxwood Wreath// Shibang DesignsLast year my wreath lasted more than 4 months, and when it was all dried up, I pulled out the old leaves and saved the wire to use again this year. Of course, if you like ribbons and embellishments you could add them afterward but I prefer to keep it simple.

How to make a boxwood wreath

UPDATED & IMPROVED BOXWOOD WREATH 2016 

I have an improved version of this wreath to see here:

Boxwood Wreath DIY // Shibang Designs