Refinished Staircase Banister Before & After

 

banister-before-after-shibang-designs

Sometimes a lot of elbow grease and very little in the way of supplies can have a huge impact. In this case, I’m talking about refinishing staircase banisters. This was something that I tackled early on because the honey oak colour was not my style.

My neighbour refinished her banister and this gave me the confidence to try it myself. This was a lot of work (especially since we have two staircases) and it’s messy but it was worth the effort!

I used leftover paint as a primer on the spindles followed by a topcoat of the leftover kitchen cabinet paint.

I chose a very dark, almost black stain for the railing. There’s a Canadian company, Saman, that I like to use because the stain is water based and it had the topcoat mixed into the product.

Kitchen Staircase

This photo is from when we first moved in and before any of my painting & moulding projects.

stairs_kitchen- before

Here it is after using a stripper to remove the varnish followed by sanding. This is an important step because without the necessary preparation and removal of the varnish, the stain won’t go on the wood evenly.

Staircase Banister Progress

This is the finished banister.Finished Banister // Shibang Designs

Basement Staircase

This is how the staircase that leads to the basement looked when we first moved in.  Here I started by painting the walls a lighter colour and then we added a large, statement light fixture.

Staircase Before // Shibang Designs

This is the view from the basement.

Basement Staircase

The view from upstairs.Basement Banister Progress

The finished banister.

basement_after

How to Refinish a Staircase Banister // Shibang Designs

If you look through previous posts there are lots of other photos that show the finished banister from other angles.

How to Install Board & Batten

How to Install a Board & Batten Wall by Shibang Designs

Today I’ve got a tutorial and reveal of the completed board & batten wall, created in collaboration with The Home Depot Canada. Since I’m usually learning as I go, The Home Depot staff are who I rely on to answer questions and give advice for whatever project I’m working on.

These are the steps that I followed. It’s important to measure, plan, keep lines level and plumb, nail into studs when possible and when in doubt – ask for advice!

ing Wood Cut to Size at The Home Depot Canada

Board & Batten Wall Tutorial // Shibang Designs

Removing the baseboard was my first step because it was thin and wouldn’t look right with the pine boards. I used a flathead screwdriver to pry it off and it came off much easier than I expected.

Next, I marked all of the studs and finalized the placement of my vertical boards. These boards I had cut to length at The Home Depot Canada. Since I live close to the store I planned to start with only these 1″ x 4″ Pine Select boards and then return to have the horizontal pieces cut. When choosing boards make sure to get ones that are straight. If you don’t know how to check, just ask for assistance. If the boards are warped it makes it more challenging to attach them to the wall.

Board & Batten Wall Tutorial // Shibang Designs

I used 1 1/2″ spiral finishing nails which were recommended to me since they have more grip than a regular finishing nail. For some boards that don’t stay on the wall flush, I used a few dots of Construction Adhesive to make sure they held.
img_3568

The next step was to take the measurements between the boards before heading back to get the horizontal pieces cut.  The policy is us that you pay after the first two cuts but if you visit when it’s not too busy the staff usually go above and beyond. Having a sketch helps to remember which pieces go where and what lengths are required.

home-depot-cut-list

When I got home I started figuring out spacing on the wall. I did have to adjust a couple of boards with my hand saw because I had taken the wrong measurement.

I started with the top pieces and made sure they were in a level line. It turns out that our basement height is quite uneven so to create a level line across the top I left a gap (which will later be covered with moulding). These smaller pieces are held up with 2 -3 nails. Along the bottom edge, I wanted to make sure that in the future if we were going to replace the flooring it would be possible to easily remove the bottom boards.

Painting the bottom pieces before adding them to the wall would have made it much easier. To save yourself some hassle, paint them first!

Board & Batten DIY

Where the boards intersected I used a wood filler and sanded once it was dry.Board & Batten Wall DIY with Pine Boards

When it comes time to paint, if you’re using a product that has a primer built in you can paint directly onto the wood. Along all of the edges where the boards meet the wall, I ran a strip of caulking along it. I have a caulking gun and have found it to very worthwhile to have. It allows you to purchase tubes of caulking or construction adhesive which are easier to apply than little containers that you squeeze out.
Board & Batten Wall DIY // Shibang DesignsBoard & Batten Wall DIYAfter final sanding, painting and caulking.How to Install Board & Batten

Adding an Accent WallThis reveal wasn’t about changing everything in the room. The paint colour stayed the same but now the basement has a feature and interest that it didn’t have before.
Board & Batten Wall DIYThank you to The Home Depot Canada for helping make this vision a reality! If you have an idea of a project but don’t know where to start they are a wonderful resource of information and guidance.

Here’s a little reminder of where it started and some of the steps along the way.

How to take walls from bland to interesting with the addition of board and batten. Full tutorial on the blog. Shibang Designs

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Basement Before
Basement Before

Adding Architectural Elements – Before

Since moving into our home two years ago I have been on a mission to update, improve and add character to this builder basic home. The main entry and staircase are a focal point that I wanted to emphasize with moulding. I am so excited to be partnering with Metrie to use their beautiful mouldings to add the style and substance to our home.

Entry Before Adding Chair Rail & Panel Moulding

Before // Shibang Designs
The Main Entrance & Staircase Before
Rough Planning Sketch of Moulding
A Rough Sketch of the Moulding

I chose this chair rail for its thick profile and rounded shape that would work with the rest of the home. I had been searching for the moulding to use below the chair rail for quite some time then I came across panel mouding from Metrie’s French Curves Collection. It has lines that coordinated well with the chair rail I had selected.

Metrie Moulding Profiles - Chair Rail & Panel Molding

Refinished Banister -- Goodbye Golden Oak!

I started out by painting the walls and doors as well as refinishing the banister railing to get the other main elements in the room ready. Since I knew that I wanted a chair rail, I went ahead and painted the wall white, using painter’s tape to make a clean line on the lower portion of the wall. Going up the staircase I used the shadow that was cast by the railing to get an idea of the angle and adjusted it from there. Painting gave me an instant visual for how the walls would look with the moulding.

The installation of the chair rail has been a huge learning curve. When I started out, I had no idea about the angles so I bought a very basic mitre box, hand saw and nail setter. Thinking about how wood panelling would have been installed by carpenters before power tools gave me the confidence to ease into the project with limited hand tools.

These are the tools that I used to install the chair rail. If I had known how much I would use my mitre box and saw, I would have bought a slightly better quality one. This one works fine but there are others available for not too much more.

How to DIY Chair Rail Using a Mitre Box & Hand Saw -- No Power Tools Necessary!

Here’s a look at how the front entry is looking so far. The moulding makes the space seem larger in this tight space.

Entryway After Painting and Installing Chair Rail DIY

How to Install Chair Rail Moulding

Working through the main entrance was pretty easy once I got the hang of understanding how to cut the angles. What I didn’t consider was how angles would get a bit trickier on walls that aren’t square and staircases that have complicated angles.

DIY Chair Rail in Hallway Using a Hand Saw & Mitre Box

Here’s a look at the upstairs hallway where I’m continuing the moulding for a cohesive look.

Planning Placement for Picture Frame Wainscotting

I’ve begun cutting the panel moulding and I’m in the process of creating jigs to assemble the frames before attaching them to the wall. For this part and the complex angles on the stairs, I am using books for guidance and technical advice.

DIY Panel Moulding -- Making a Jig

Once I start to get the frames cut and up on the wall, I’ll make a tutorial showing more of the steps. What I’ve learned so far is that installing interior mouldings is much easier than I thought it would be when you’re sticking to rooms with square corners. Installing a chair rail in a powder room or hallway could easily be done with a hand saw if you don’t have a mitre saw.

Related Projects:

 

Black Interior Doors
Black Interior Doors

Shiplap Planked Wall

DIY Shiplap by Shibang Designs, original tutorial by House of Smiths

Here’s a look at the shiplap wall that my friend Kate and I installed in my living room. Since we won’t be knocking down this wall that separates the kitchen I decided to make it an accent instead. Originally I had wanted to do a brick veneer but the cost was 10 times more than going the wood plank route.DIY Shiplap //Shibang Designs This was the wall before. The wood planks were  cut at the hardware store from a larger sheet of plywood.DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs Around the top edge I wanted crown moulding and since I do not have the tools to cut it I used these pre-fabricated corners. It was tricky for us to install this part.
DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs DIY Shiplap // Shibang DesignsWhat I didn’t expect was how the ceilings would appear so much taller with the moulding.
DIY Shiplap // Shibang Designs Since I like neat and tidy edges I added corner guards where the panelling edges meet because this wall is exposed from all four sides. Shibang Designs

The tutorial that I followed for this wall was from The House of Smiths. These are my process photos but for lots of information I suggest going to the original post from The House of Smiths.House of Smiths DIY Planked Wall TutorialThis was an inexpensive project that adds lots of character to the space. It is relatively easy if you have a blank wall without many outlets or vents and requires very few tools to complete.

Kitchen Makeover on a Budget

All White Kitchen // Shibang Designs

Here are some photos of the backsplash installation. This part dramatically changed the feeling of the space.

Subway Tiling // Shibang Designs

White Subway Tile Backsplash // Shibang DesignsHere you can see a little look at the honey coloured wood that used to be here.
White Subway Tile Backsplash // Shibang Designs White Subway Tile Backsplash // Shibang Designs

I added some wood corner pieces on the corners of the walls to conceal the tile edge as well as  crown moulding along the top of valance. It took me several weeks to complete all of my finishing touches when the tiling itself was only 5 hours when done by someone we hired. I like learning and every time it gets a bit easier to install moulding and other architectural details.

White Kitchen and Herbs // Shibang Designs

It looks like a different kitchen and it still has the same elements, just a lot has been added to embellish and customize it.

How to get your dream kitchen on a budget

Related Posts 

Shibang Designs Painting Progress
Painting Kitchen Cabinets
White Quartz Samples
White Quartz Counters
Thrift Store Table Refinishing
Thrift Store Dining Table Refinished

 

 

 

Before & After French Provincial Dining Table

Some Tips on DIY Furniture Refinishing // Shibang DesignsThis is my latest piece of furniture that I’ve refinished. After doing the last dining room table I think that I was so happy with the results that I chose to forget how much sanding and time had been involved. I think that for people who see the potential in secondhand objects it can be hard to pass up a project. When I saw this French Provincial style dining table with queen anne legs and a pretty scalloped top I had to restore it!

This is a more process oriented post than normal because I documented all of the steps it took to get to the finished product. Hopefully all of this trial and error will help someone about to start a refinishing project or in the midst of one.

This is what I learned along the way…

Shibang Designs Table BeforeThis is the before and while the shape was beautiful, the scratches, worn edges and finish needed some work. What I didn’t expect was that this top would be very hard to sand down evenly and the staining process gave me more trouble that it ever has before.Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessAfter using a stripper (which did nothing) and sanding there were uneven patches.

Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessI tried the darkest stain I had to try to balance out the uneven colour with a red cherry stain I already had.

Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessThen I applied a light grey stain but this colour wasn’t the look I was going for.
Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessI ended up having to buy another stain, a dark grey which is pictured above. I also used chalk paint in graphite as a base layer for the bottom.Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessThis is it after a couple coats of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in white. After all of the trouble with the stain not working how I wanted, the paint was so easy and enjoyable to do. I distressed the base with some sanding and then added a coat of light grey stain and sealed it with a matte varnish.IMG_8475Since this table was going up for sale after being completed I took some photos for fun.Shibang Designs Refinished Table Shibang Designs Refinished TableFrench Provincial Table Before & After :: Shibang DesignsI keep saying that this is the last time I’ll refinish furniture that isn’t for our house but I think that if I come across the right piece I’ll do it again.

Shibang Designs on Apartment Therapy

Thanks Apartment Therapy for the feature!

This is another table that I refinished in a different style if you want to see more.

Featured on Apartment Therapy

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table

Table Process

Farmhouse tables with light wood and trestle or pedestal bases are my favourite style for dining and I was determined to make it work in our small kitchen and on a small budget. Many tables in the market aren’t narrow enough to fit our space so when I came across this one at a thrift store I knew it would work after a major refinishing job.

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table

Thrift Store Table BeforeIt took hours and hours of scraping and sanding until I was able to get it right down to the wood so that I could stain it a light driftwood grey.IMG_3697


For the pedestals I took an electric sander to get rid of all that varnish and gloss to reveal the solid wood below. I am not a perfectionist when it comes to furniture refinishing in our house because I’d rather get the job done and I know that it’s going to be subject to heavy use and abuse.
before and after pedestals IMG_5502

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table Refinished DetailPedestal TableThe next step is going to be constructing a banquette to go along wall which is why having a pedestal base was important to make it easy to get around the table.
Limelight Hydrangea & Boston Ferns

You can also check out this table featured on Apartment Therapy.

Featured on Apartment Therapy

Painted Kitchen Cabinets

Shibang Designs Painted Cabinets
Kitchen Cabinets Painted Before & AfterBeforeWhen we chose this house one thing that I liked was the potential for some cosmetic improvements. The cabinets were wood and in good shape and luckily the counter and floor tiles were neutral greys.Shibang Designs Painted Kitchen Cabinets

I finally decided on which shade of white to use (Vanilla Milkshake, partly because of the name) and tackled painting the kitchen cabinets late in the evenings. Benjamin Moore Advance Paint Vanilla Milkshake

Shibang Designs Painting ProgressEven with a single coat of primer the space already looks brighter and bigger.

Shibang Designs Adding Pine Panelling At the end of the cabinets I added pine panelling to give a more custom look instead of the little plastic plugs that were originally there.IMG_4927

Shibang Designs Kitchen Before

Painted Kitchen

Shibang Designs Kitchen Hardware Before

The only hardware that I changed was on the drawers because I really believe in working with what you already have and the existing hardware was classic and simple.

For a minimal amount of money (and many hours of work) the kitchen feels brighter and less dated. Of course there are several other things I’d like to add but for now it’s a huge improvement.

At Home: Garage & Front Door Paint Makeover

Exterior Paint

It’s amazing how quickly and inexpensive it is to transform something with paint. This was a makeover I gave our front door, garage & post with these three small cans of paint.

Garage before

We have a semi detached home and I wanted our garage door to match with our neighbours so I did a colour match and then painted fake windows along the top. I love the look of windows on garages and since we weren’t going to be replacing ours this did the trick by masking off the lines with tape and using paint from the front door.

painted garage

Front Door Before

This was a really straightforward and inexpensive project that gave the impact I was looking for and worked with what we already had – except for the paint.

Front Door PaintedAdding Curb Appeal

At Home: Painted Kitchen Chairs

Mismatched Chairs Painted - Shibang Designs
When looking for chairs in our kitchen I wanted something second hand, good quality and durable. Knowing that I would paint the chairs made it easier to find four that were similar but different and could be unified once unified in the same colour.
Here are our kitchen chairs painted with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in Graphite. I was lucky to find them on Kijiji from Cindy who paints a lot of furniture herself and had already done the work in collecting them.
wooden chairs
Shibang Designs - Graphite Chalk Paint
Shibang Designs - Graphite Chalk PaintAfter over a year the paint has held up well with only a tiny worn spots where the chair hits the table when it’s pushed in.
Shibang Designs - Graphite Chalk Paint Chairs