How to Build a Cedar Planter & Privacy Screen

How to Make this Cedar Planter & Lattice

Here’s a brief photo guide showing how I made these cedar planters and lattice. The construction was quite straight-forward, especially making the boxes.

The cedar boards were cut to my measurements at Home Depot so when I brought the pieces home they were ready to assemble. The outer boards are cedar decking and the inside supports are spruce 2″x2″s. First, I assembled the front and back sides before adding on the ends. These were so large that I could fit inside the planters as I put them together.
I chose to stain the boxes and lattice pieces for a modern look. This is an opaque stain and it took two coats to get even coverage. The lattice is made of pine 2″x 2″s and 2″x3″s for the outer frame. Using these gave me the flexibility to choose my own spacing for the lattice grid plus they could fit in my car when a 4’x8′ sheet of premade lattice wouldn’t be able to. 
Once the boxes were positioned, I attached two panels to connect the planters and create the illusion of a box around the dogwood shrub that is already planted.
After Staining the pieces for the lattice I began to assemble them right beside the planters so that I wouldn’t have to walk very far carrying the screen once it was built. I predrilled holes and used deck screws to attach the pieces.

To make it more manageable to install I made one large screen first, attached it to the fence in a few spots and then filled in the sides with the smaller portions. My friend gave me a hand lifting the large screen into place and holding it and the rest I was able to do alone.

To line up the side portion of the lattice, I made a basic frame and then added the horizontal pieces to match up with the existing grid.


Once the planter boxes were in place and the lattice was complete I lined the boxes with landscaping fabric and then filled them with soil. I packed these boxes with kale this year and have put some spring bulbs in as well. Once winter comes, I plan to fill the planters with boughs and branches – these are perfect for multi-season use.

To look back on more photos from the progress and plans for this project below are links to previous posts.

ORC Week 1 – Inspiration

ORC Weeks 2 & 3

ORC Week 5

ORC Week 6

Final Reveal

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ORC – Final Reveal – Part 2

Here is the final reveal of the planter box and lattice that I built for the One Room Challenge.

In the boxes I planted several types of kale since I know that they grow well in this spot and will provide us with steady greens into September. There are also 4 clematis plants to grow up the lattice and vinca vines to spill down the front of the boxes.

Here’s a reminder of what the fence looked like before. 

Now is the part that I love, watching the vines fill up the lattice and having a constant supply of leafy greens for the next few months.

The Before & After of this project is also on Apartment Therapy.


More photos of what this area looked like before I started and inspiration can be found here:

Week One – One Room Challenge

Photo Instructions on How to Build This:


 

ORC – Week 6 Reveal- Part 1

The 6 weeks of the One Room Challenge are over now and it’s time for the final reveal. My reveal is going to be a two-part post because I’m not quite done building and we were still having frost warnings last week so I’ll be waiting to plant. The planters are currently in place but in the photo above I drew in the lattice since it’s not done yet.

This was some prep work along the fenceline where the raised beds will be going. Since they’re open on the bottom I dug up the grass where the boxes will be sitting.

Constructing the boxes was so smooth and quick but staining them and the lattice strips have taken much longer than I had anticipated.

Here is the  14 feet of raised planters in place in the garden. This space already feels more organized and expansive with the black boxes.

The lattice is coming together and I hope to have it installed within the next 2 weeks. Since it is 8 feet tall I need a hand putting it in place plus there is still more lattice that needs to be stained.

In the meantime, by propping up some wood it gives me an idea of the space will look once the full screen is installed.

The final reveal is now on Apartment Therapy

Before & After: Plants and Privacy, What More Could a Backyard Need?

 

To see how the other One Room Challenges turned out click here for the final reveals. It’s incredible to see how much changed in such a short time.

Dining Area Update

How to Install Panel Moulding for Beginners
After finishing the moulding installation throughout the staircase with Metrie I had a bit of extra panel moulding, just enough to do one more project. After seeing how much depth and interest trim brings to the walls I decided to do a quick project above the kitchen table. It gets so much easier with practice and something this scale could be done with a hand saw, mitre box and hammer, no special tools required.

Adding Architectural ElementsThis is the wall before.

Panel Moulding DIY

I put scrap pieces of moulding up and tried different placement, taking photos to get an idea of what would look best. Then, I did a sketch with the final measurements before cutting the moulding to size.Planning Panel Moulding Layout // Shibang Designs

Panel Molding DIYThese boxes are 54″ in height and since I was only doing three, I put the pieces up one at a time. With the height, I left enough room at the top so that if one day we wanted to add crown moulding that could still be an option. Panel MouldingNot every step is pictured here but there are more general instructions in my first tutorial.
Panel Moulding DIY

Panel Moulding DIY

This is what the area looked like in the real estate listing.
DIY Kitchen Makeover

Related Posts:

hand-tools
How to Install Panel Moulding
Staircase Makeover Adding Panel Moulding and Refinishing // Shibang Designs
Staircase Makeover Reveal
Featured on Apartment Therapy
Farmhouse Table Makeover Featured on Apartment Therapy

Before & After French Provincial Dining Table

Some Tips on DIY Furniture Refinishing // Shibang DesignsThis is my latest piece of furniture that I’ve refinished. After doing the last dining room table I think that I was so happy with the results that I chose to forget how much sanding and time had been involved. I think that for people who see the potential in secondhand objects it can be hard to pass up a project. When I saw this French Provincial style dining table with queen anne legs and a pretty scalloped top I had to restore it!

This is a more process oriented post than normal because I documented all of the steps it took to get to the finished product. Hopefully all of this trial and error will help someone about to start a refinishing project or in the midst of one.

This is what I learned along the way…

Shibang Designs Table BeforeThis is the before and while the shape was beautiful, the scratches, worn edges and finish needed some work. What I didn’t expect was that this top would be very hard to sand down evenly and the staining process gave me more trouble that it ever has before.Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessAfter using a stripper (which did nothing) and sanding there were uneven patches.

Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessI tried the darkest stain I had to try to balance out the uneven colour with a red cherry stain I already had.

Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessThen I applied a light grey stain but this colour wasn’t the look I was going for.
Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessI ended up having to buy another stain, a dark grey which is pictured above. I also used chalk paint in graphite as a base layer for the bottom.Shibang Designs Table Refinishing ProcessThis is it after a couple coats of Annie Sloan Chalk Paint in white. After all of the trouble with the stain not working how I wanted, the paint was so easy and enjoyable to do. I distressed the base with some sanding and then added a coat of light grey stain and sealed it with a matte varnish.IMG_8475Since this table was going up for sale after being completed I took some photos for fun.Shibang Designs Refinished Table Shibang Designs Refinished TableFrench Provincial Table Before & After :: Shibang DesignsI keep saying that this is the last time I’ll refinish furniture that isn’t for our house but I think that if I come across the right piece I’ll do it again.

Shibang Designs on Apartment Therapy

Thanks Apartment Therapy for the feature!

This is another table that I refinished in a different style if you want to see more.

Featured on Apartment Therapy

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table

Table Process

Farmhouse tables with light wood and trestle or pedestal bases are my favourite style for dining and I was determined to make it work in our small kitchen and on a small budget. Many tables in the market aren’t narrow enough to fit our space so when I came across this one at a thrift store I knew it would work after a major refinishing job.

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table

Thrift Store Table BeforeIt took hours and hours of scraping and sanding until I was able to get it right down to the wood so that I could stain it a light driftwood grey.IMG_3697


For the pedestals I took an electric sander to get rid of all that varnish and gloss to reveal the solid wood below. I am not a perfectionist when it comes to furniture refinishing in our house because I’d rather get the job done and I know that it’s going to be subject to heavy use and abuse.
before and after pedestals IMG_5502

Thrift Store Farmhouse Table Refinished DetailPedestal TableThe next step is going to be constructing a banquette to go along wall which is why having a pedestal base was important to make it easy to get around the table.
Limelight Hydrangea & Boston Ferns

You can also check out this table featured on Apartment Therapy.

Featured on Apartment Therapy